Faer Films

Movie reviews and recommendations
GOODNIGHT MOOVIE: The Emperor’s New Groove 

GOODNIGHT MOOVIE: The Emperor’s New Groove 

One of the best Bond films I’ve seen. Entertaining from the title sequence to the heart-racing ending. The cast, the music, the costumes were all fabulous. A+

One of the best Bond films I’ve seen. Entertaining from the title sequence to the heart-racing ending. The cast, the music, the costumes were all fabulous. A+

The best yet! It is amazing to see how these movies have developed throughout the series or shall I say “saga”. Not only has the direction improved, but the script, the special effects and the acting as well. I was especially impressed by Robert Pattison’s performance. I was also happy with Kirsten Stewart as a vampire. I was a little nervous because I thought Bella’s transformation into a vampire was one of the most intriguing parts of not only Breaking Dawn but of all the books. The actress who played Bella’s daughter also did a great job for such a young, fresh face. The movie was incredibly heart wrenching- yes I’ve been a Twilight fan since the first book was released, but even people who are unfamiliar with the books may find it emotional. It was sad when it needed to be, funnier than I thought it would be, and the ending… well you’ll just have to see for yourself! 

The best yet! It is amazing to see how these movies have developed throughout the series or shall I say “saga”. Not only has the direction improved, but the script, the special effects and the acting as well. I was especially impressed by Robert Pattison’s performance. I was also happy with Kirsten Stewart as a vampire. I was a little nervous because I thought Bella’s transformation into a vampire was one of the most intriguing parts of not only Breaking Dawn but of all the books. The actress who played Bella’s daughter also did a great job for such a young, fresh face. The movie was incredibly heart wrenching- yes I’ve been a Twilight fan since the first book was released, but even people who are unfamiliar with the books may find it emotional. It was sad when it needed to be, funnier than I thought it would be, and the ending… well you’ll just have to see for yourself! 

Photo- curtosy of lookingcloser.org
Snow White and the Huntsman
This film was entertaining. Special effects were noteworthy. Charlize Theron did an excellent job portraying an evil queen (just look at that expression!) My sister did a report for her film class on the ideological differences between the original and this version. I found it very interesting especially reading it before and after viewing the remake. There are actually many film editions of Snow White. It would be interesting to compare them all. Anyone willing to take the challenge? Here is an excerpt comparing the first and the latest, take a look! 
by Taylor Browning
A Princess and A Queen
In the animated version, Snow White is given what many believed to be feminine characteristics of the time. In 1937, Snow White is weak and passive. She is characterized as being all the things an exceptional women was to be during this time period. She is “passive, pretty, patient, obedient, industrious, and quiet” (Inge). This is a far depiction from the impressive and formidable Snow White heroin found in the remake. Both women in the 1937 film, Snow White and  her nemesis, the Queen, are not present in any of the action of the film as well and this can also be portrayed in the queen. When the Queen wants to kill Snow White she sends the huntsman to bring Snow White into the forest, kill her and bring back her heart. The Queen seems able to possess the power of black magic and can easily kill Snow White herself but she sends a man do go and do the dirty work. Snow White does not partake in any of the controversy either. She is not even present when her nemesis falls to her own death. Instead, Snow White is illustrated as a damsel in distress waiting for her prince. When she is placed in a coffin made of glass and gold Prince Charming, a man, comes to save her with a true love’s kiss.
The prince is characterized as Snow White’s savior. This seems to emphasize the need for a male companionship which is somewhat contradicted in the second film, Snow White and the Huntsman. In the very beginning of the film, the Queen kills Snow White’s father and becomes the new leader of the land.  As she is killing the former ruler she tells him “Men use women. They ruin us”. From the start there is a theme introduced that men are to blame for women’s mistaken weakness. It is unknown whether the Queen rules the land alone in the original version. In the remake it is clear the Queen rules over everyone, women and men. Her brother even looks up to her and obeys her every command. Early in the film a boy stabs the Queen, only to find out she is resilient to his attempt to murder her. It is only Snow White who can kill her. Therefore Snow White takes it upon herself to learn to fight and lead men, another great contradiction to the first film. 
Bibliography
Beckstett, Alexandra. “Snow White: Disney’s Depiction of Women and Society.” Web Blog post. Suite101. 29 Mar. 2011. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://suite101.com/article/snow-white-disneys-depiction-of-women-and-society-a362772>.
Gray, Jonathan. “(Chapter 6) Channel Interference: Television and Power.” Television Entertainment. New York: Routledge, 2008. 156-67. Print.
Hall, Stuart. “The Work of Representation.” The Media Studies Reader. By Laurie Ouellette. New York: Routledge, 2013. 171-84. Print.
Hebdige, Dick. Subculture: The Meaning Of Style. London and New York: Routledge, 1984. Print.
Inge, M. Thomas. “Art, Adaptation, and Ideology: Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Journal of Popular Film and Television 32.3. Fall 2004. 132-42. Print.

Photo- curtosy of lookingcloser.org

Snow White and the Huntsman

This film was entertaining. Special effects were noteworthy. Charlize Theron did an excellent job portraying an evil queen (just look at that expression!) My sister did a report for her film class on the ideological differences between the original and this version. I found it very interesting especially reading it before and after viewing the remake. There are actually many film editions of Snow White. It would be interesting to compare them all. Anyone willing to take the challenge? Here is an excerpt comparing the first and the latest, take a look! 

by Taylor Browning

A Princess and A Queen

In the animated version, Snow White is given what many believed to be feminine characteristics of the time. In 1937, Snow White is weak and passive. She is characterized as being all the things an exceptional women was to be during this time period. She is “passive, pretty, patient, obedient, industrious, and quiet” (Inge). This is a far depiction from the impressive and formidable Snow White heroin found in the remake. Both women in the 1937 film, Snow White and  her nemesis, the Queen, are not present in any of the action of the film as well and this can also be portrayed in the queen. When the Queen wants to kill Snow White she sends the huntsman to bring Snow White into the forest, kill her and bring back her heart. The Queen seems able to possess the power of black magic and can easily kill Snow White herself but she sends a man do go and do the dirty work. Snow White does not partake in any of the controversy either. She is not even present when her nemesis falls to her own death. Instead, Snow White is illustrated as a damsel in distress waiting for her prince. When she is placed in a coffin made of glass and gold Prince Charming, a man, comes to save her with a true love’s kiss.

The prince is characterized as Snow White’s savior. This seems to emphasize the need for a male companionship which is somewhat contradicted in the second film, Snow White and the Huntsman. In the very beginning of the film, the Queen kills Snow White’s father and becomes the new leader of the land.  As she is killing the former ruler she tells him “Men use women. They ruin us”. From the start there is a theme introduced that men are to blame for women’s mistaken weakness. It is unknown whether the Queen rules the land alone in the original version. In the remake it is clear the Queen rules over everyone, women and men. Her brother even looks up to her and obeys her every command. Early in the film a boy stabs the Queen, only to find out she is resilient to his attempt to murder her. It is only Snow White who can kill her. Therefore Snow White takes it upon herself to learn to fight and lead men, another great contradiction to the first film. 

Bibliography

Beckstett, Alexandra. “Snow White: Disney’s Depiction of Women and Society.” Web Blog post. Suite101. 29 Mar. 2011. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://suite101.com/article/snow-white-disneys-depiction-of-women-and-society-a362772>.

Gray, Jonathan. “(Chapter 6) Channel Interference: Television and Power.” Television Entertainment. New York: Routledge, 2008. 156-67. Print.

Hall, Stuart. “The Work of Representation.” The Media Studies Reader. By Laurie Ouellette. New York: Routledge, 2013. 171-84. Print.

Hebdige, Dick. Subculture: The Meaning Of Style. London and New York: Routledge, 1984. Print.

Inge, M. Thomas. “Art, Adaptation, and Ideology: Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Journal of Popular Film and Television 32.3. Fall 2004. 132-42. Print.